Richard Sammons


Fairfax & Sammons
fairfaxandsammons.com

67 Gansevoort Street, 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10014
212-255-0704


Richard-Sammons

Richard has a rich background in traditional period design and is well known for his work in architectural proportion, having taught at The Prince of Wales's Institute of Architecture in London and The Institute of Classical Architecture and the Pratt Institute in New York. He began his career in the office of David Anthony Easton in New York where he worked for several years. He established Fairfax & Sammons Architects, P.C. over twelve years ago with Anne Fairfax, his partner in marriage as well as business. The firm has grown to some twenty members, and is committed to an architecture of both tradition and innovation. Drawing inspiration from the wellspring of classical traditions, the company has developed a body of work that reflects the theories of proportion and order which have been passed down through scholarship and practice for generations. At once beautiful and practical, this traditional design offers solutions to contemporary issues in architecture today. 

Situated in New York's historic Greenwich Village as well as Palm Beach, Florida, Fairfax & Sammons offers the full scope of architectural services, including design, construction drawings, and on-site construction administration. Projects range in location all over the United States and around the world and the firm holds the strong belief that the project be designed for its particular place and also be tailored to the specific needs of the client. They are well-known for their care and expertise in proportion and scale in our design. Providing full-scale drawings for design details is just one way they assure that the project is in keeping with the intent. Fairfax and Sammons has shown great interest in the survival and well-being of some of the greatest historic towns. They have won numerous awards and have been published for their restoration work in Greenwich village, to acting as a catalyst for preserving Charleston, South Carolina, to designing traditional neighborhoods in England.

© New Urban Guild 2014